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steve as well about your deep knowledge of afghanistan and pakistan and the other bordering states. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fight
. and with respect to pakistan's and safe havens there, afghanistan and the united states and pakistan all have an interest in reducing the threat of extremism in some of these border regions between afghanistan and pakistan. and that's going to require more than simply military actions. that's really going to require political and diplomatic work between afghanistan and pakistan and the united states, obviously, will have an interest in facilitating and participating in cooperation between the two sovereign countries. but as president karzai i think has indicated, it's very hard to imagine a stability and peace in the region if pakistan and afghanistan don't come to some basic agreement and understanding about the threat of extremism to both countries and both governments. and both capitals. and i think you are starting to see a greater awareness of that on the part of the pakistani government. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: the question that you have made about -- we talked about this issue of -- in detail today. about the prisoners, about the detention centers. all of these wil
our government carries out these kinds of attacks is of course in pakistan. in 2010 we saw what the obama administration was going to be like on this score. there was a u.s. drone strike in pakistan roughly every three days in 2010. 9 new america foundation tracks these things and their record shows it was an unprecedented spike in terms of how frequently we were killing people in pakistan using this particular method of killing people even though pakistan is supposedly not a war zone for us, at least not more than anywhere else in the world. interestingly, though, in 2013 it dropped off. in 2011 we launched from dropping drone strikes in pakistan roughly every three days to launching them on average every five days. then in 2012 it dropped off even further. we were launching a drone strike in pakistan about every seven or eight days as of 2012. well, how is this year shaping up? it is january 10th. so so far there have only been ten days in 2013. of those ten days in 2013 so far we have launched a drone strike in pakistan on seven out of those ten days. now, maybe that is an ab
-- afghanistan, pakistan, yemen and somalia. it's estimated that the cia and the united states military have undertaken more than three hundred drone strikes and killed about 2500 people. it's clear we have yet to understand the full impact of the country's drone war. one former obama security adviser calls the use of drone counterproductive. use of drones counterproductive, that is. and retired general stanley mcchrystal who championed use of drones in afghanistan is now advising caution. he says what scares me about the drone strikes is how they are perceived around the world. the resentment created by the use of american unmanned strikes is much greater than the average american anticipates and appreciates. they are hated on a visceral level, even by people who have never seen one or seen the everythings of one. yet earlier this week, the president nominated a man widely viewed as the administration's drone warrior to head the cia. obama counterterrorism adviser john brennan has made the legal case for targeted killings. some are now expressing concern over brennan in charge of the cia. a
drastically increased the use of predator drones. 329 targeted strikes have taken place in pakistan since 2004, but the vast majority have taken place since 2009. although opposition to the president's use of drones has remained largely silent, that seems to be changing. two days ago in hawaii protesters paraded signs close to where the first family was vacationing, which read drones kill kids and is it really okay if obama does it? last week a federal judge ruled the administration did not need to disclose internal communications about the drone program. the "new york times" and the aclu had filed requests in 2011 for the legal justification of these targeted killings, including the drone strike that killed anwar al alaki, an american citizen living in yemen. the white house denied that request for purposes of national security. the judge approved the administration's right to keep that information classified, but still questioned the drone program, writing, "i can find no way around the thicket of laws and precedents that effectively allow the executive brarchg of our government to proclaim
, but will she be returning to pakistan to continue her fight? the latest on malhala's story coming up. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. take long. i'm done. are you thinking what i'm thinking? ♪ give me just a little more time ♪ okay. all right. oh! [ female announcer ] the 2-in-1 swiffer sweeper uses electrostatic dry cloths to clean better than a broom. and its wet mopping cloths can clean better than a mop in half the time so you don't miss a thing. mom, have you seen my -- hey! hey! he did it. [ female announcer ] swiffer. better clean in half the time. or your money back. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with ev
, climbing support for the state department. you have pakistan and afghanistan, with the drawal from afghanistan that will only make it harder, and that has impact on pakistan. china, and russia. leadership in russia, as you know, very, very complicated. where does he look first for support, and, you know, who wants this job? >> i would say the middle east -- the hard thing that you hit on is the challenges for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled
's not over in afghanistan. b, to the degree that al qaeda has moved over into pakistan, that's a country that has over 100 nuclear weapons. syria, which is an ongoing problem. the suggestion constantly seems to be that we need to come in on the side of the rebels. there are at least 1,000 al qaeda members in syria today fighting on the side of the rebels. if the chemical weapons fall into their hands, big problems. you mentioned iran. remember now, and it may even have been on this program, i think that netanyahu suggested that come spring, come early summer, if the iranians still have not pulled back from building a nuclear weapon, the israelis may attack. the iranians would respond against the united states. and they have the capacity to do it with cyber war. >> i think it's even bigger and more troubling than that. it isn't just the middle east and that region. look at north korea. announcing that they are going to target the united states. they have nuclear weapons, unlike iran at this point. you look at what happened in algeria and mali. the egypt problem is not solved. i actually h
, afghanistan, and pakistan. every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to mali and the drc and somalia? >> i would recommend -- there was an article in one of the newspapers that went into detail and here's how it started. for more than two decades, they required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractors for the embassies abroad. you get what you pay for. the provision started in 1990 and stayed with us. i would respectfully request that this submitee take a look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody, at least look at the high threat posts where we did it for iraq, afghanistan and pack o pakistan and the countries you are naming are countries that i would fall into that category. >> thank you very much. among the various extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view,
. in part because over the last years and in pakistan and iraq and afghanistan and yemen and elsewhere. we rely on proprofessionals to implement the protocols to keep our people safe and as i said i have a lot of confidence in them and most of the time they get it right. i was also engaged and think this is what deputy secretary burns was referring to. in the issues related to the deteriorating threat environment, particularly in libya. we were also watching to try to see what we could do to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country to deal with the many militias. we have many programs and actions we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials. i went to libya in october of 2011 and in fact shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint dod could for border security ct capabilities and wmd efforts. i wanted to clarify that there were specific instances and assessments going on primarily by the security professionals related to individual posts including benghazi. >> what
-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and foreign policy, the get month trials, however, we -- there was a lot of discussion, a lot of hub bub when they were going to be in new york, but here they are beginning in guantanamo bay, and there is very little discussion about the fact that they are happening there. you guys have challenged the sort of legitimacy of these. the nation writes today "at guantanamo the government is still making up the law as i
. the president said he had approved a covert mission inside pakistan that resulted in the death of the founder and later of al qaeda, the group that attacked us on september 11th, 2001, which led congress to pass the authorization for use of military force, which has justified the 12 years of war that have followed ever since. so the announcement that bin laden was dead on may 21st -- excuse me, on may 1st, 2010, may 1st, 2010. two days later, two days later on may 3rd, 2010, two days after that announcement, retired senator chuck hagel gave an interview to his hometown paper in lincoln, nebraska "the journal star." he told the paper it should reassure america and the world that america is still a leader, and we can and will get the job done. he said, quote, that is very important for the world to realize. more the point, though, chuck hagel then said, "well, now that we've killed osama bin laden, let's leave afghanistan." he said that the pursuit of bin laden and al qaeda was, quote, the reason we invaded afghanistan ten years ago. now that bin laden was dead, the president he said has to, qu
, including the areas most closer to pakistan. >> ambassador, i was struck by the last question that the president was asked at his joint press conference about afghan women. and in response, he said, in part, the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women and the u.s. strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. what is the reality right now for women and girls in afghanistan? and what is the reality likely to be for women and girls after the u.s. troop presence is withdrawn? >> in the major cities in kabul, obviously, it's been a huge renaissance of women's rights and across the country and the u.s. military empowered young women building schools and institutions to promote women's rights and microfinance. but when you get closer outside the countryside, away from the major cities, there have been attacks by the taliban on schools, against women, and so, this is where the fault line lies. the women who are furthest away from the major cities of the -- that are under the control of the central government most at risk o
in pakistan. but the use of the drones expand beyond, this discussion of how they can be used else where in africa and this goes far beyond the initial legal definition of pursuing a war against those who had perpetrated 9/11. so, i think mr. brennan has been trying to move the justifications to match the current circumstances. and the question is, will they be beyond the law? a very central proponent of the light footprint strategy. special forces in place of sending in 1 00,000 troops to iraq or afghanistan or to a ground invasion in libya or syria and that's now beginning to run a little bit to the end of its utility as you've seen in syria. so, i think he'll get a lot of questions about that, as well. >> david, who runs the drone war? the cia and the pentagon and who should run the drone war? >> well, there are two wars. the pentagon does the overuse of drones. so, we can use them, say, in afghanistan. where there is a declared military action. but in pakistan or any place where it's used in a covert way, that's the cia. and most of those decisions are made in mr. brennan's basement
march for afghanistan, pakistan, and iraq, but value should be a priority in all locations, and particularly in high-risk environments. we're also looking at where soul source contracting may be appropriate, to respond for certain security-related contacts. the administrative review board also supports expanding the marine security guard program, hiring and equipping more diplomatic security personnel, and of critical importance, authorizing full funding for the capital cost sharing program. the capital cost sharing program for embassy construction was created in the aftermath of the 1998 bombings of the u.s. embassies in nairobi that resulted in 224 deaths, including 11 american citizens. in its first year, it funded the construction of 13 new facilities, followed by 11 in 2006, 9 in 2005. nearly every year since, fewer facilities have been built than in the previous year, due to both funding decreases and the fact that the allocations to the account have never been indexed to inflation. costs in the construction industry worldwide have risen tremendously. at the current a
afghanistan and pakistan certainly has taken out a whole kad dre of leadership. what we're seeing now are people who have migrated parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihadist sind indicate, some of them use that name and others use different names, but the fact is they are terrorists. they are extremists and they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even those new islamists governments of controlling territory. although there has been the decimation of al qaeda, we do have could contend with the want to bes and affiliated going forward. >> thank you. >> thank you mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary, for being here. and it's great to see you today. you have been i think a real dedicated public serve ant for your country and your travels around the world, the million miles that you've put on and all of the countries you visited. and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state. and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these countries, the difference it makes to have you there on the ground. so i first o
through the middle east. and iran, pakistan, afghanistan. as you close on your tenure, i was wondering if you might be willing to share some important lessons learned from the time you spent in this post. and enlighten us as to what congress can do to help respond and even get in front of these threats as we move forward. and related to that if i may, assuming that you're going to say what you've said a couple of times about increased engagement at the ground level, how do we do that in areas that are unstable? where we need to depend on local governments or local security forces that we've frankly seen don't have the ability to provide the type of security that our diplomats are going to demand. >> well, congressman, it's wonderful to see you here. and i thank you for your interest in looking sort of into the future. let me just make a couple of points. first, we have a lot of tools we don't use as well as we should. i think we've abdicated the broadcasting arena where both in tv and radio which are considered kind of old fashioned media are still very important in a lot of these diff
diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bower, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times, he's been to egypt since then, and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bower. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bent over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administrati
-tablet free trial. >>> welcome back. here's stories making news this morning. in northern pakistan today, u.s. drone missile strike hit a house near the afghan border killing a taliban commander and eight others. speaking of drone attacks, a new york judge rejected a request to ask for legal justification tore such strikes. >>> the united nations says the death toll from syria's 21--month-old sill war is now more than 60,000. that's even higher than estimates made by rebel groups fighting the syrian army. >>> interested in buying a space shuttle launch pad? that's selling or renting facilities at the kennedy space center which includes space in the vehicle assembly building which was used to put together saturn five rockets for the apollo program. >>> and for the first time, astronomers studying a newborn star got a glimpse of a planet forming around it. giant gas is surrounding the star and using gravity to channel material across the gap to the interior helping that star to grow. >>> the first day of trading for 2013 had stocks on a terror following the fiscal cliff deals on capitol hi
the nomination was announced, a u.s. drone reportedly killed eight more militants in pakistan. yesterday in the announcement at the white house, president obama praised brennan's high standards as an intelligence leader. >> he has worked to imbed our efforts in a strong legal framework. he understands we're a nation of laws. and in moments of debate and decision, he asks the tough questions and he insisted on high and rigorous standards. time and again he has spoken to the american people about our counter-terrorism policies because he recognizes we have a responsibility to be open and transparent as possible. >>> all right. so in the midst of that white house ceremony that was solid and tough stuff about national security, there was one moment of comedy styling, the line of the day goes to leon panetta who is leaving as defense secretary after a long career in washington. he spoke about his retirement plans. >> the time has come for me to return to my wife sylvia, our three sons, their families, our six grandchildren and my walnut farm. dealing with a different set of nuts. >> all right
and more drone togs the sky. the united states has committed 340 drone strikes in pakistan with eight of those coming in the last 30 days n. yemen and somalia, there have been 55 drone strikes and seven of those in the last 30 days. the president's use of drones raises questions and criticiss s and inspired nyu jerome headley to gather new data. 25 specific drone strikes will be investigated, and an action praised by the proponents of the program.y spencer, you have written a ton on this, and what should we be thinking of the new technology for waging war? >> more about the platform and less about the strategy that it implements and to some degree accelerates, and what i mean by that is that the drone, itself, is not qualitatively a transformational thing in warfare. we are basically talking about aerial bombardment and using a smaller weapon to do it, and that size is just going to shrink, so you have less power applied to a particular target, but when you look at the thing and how it is applied, it is not so much different if the pilot is thousands of miles away rather nan in the co
by the pakistan for promoting education for women has been released from the hospital. what's next for malala and the girls she was fighting for. >>> pledging bipartisanship, but as he gets ready to come back from hawaii and start the new year, he also has a warning for republicans. don't use the debt ceiling as leverage. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they've already racked up. if congress refuses the ability for the united states to pay its bills on time, it could be cat strofk. kristen welker with the president in honolulu. it will be a big change of scenery when he gets back to washington. tell us some of the battles on the horizon for the president. >> reporter: hi, craig. good afternoon. there are three budget battles on the horizon. the one getting the most attention right now is the fight over the debt ceiling and the debt ceiling is like the nation's credit card. the nation has essentially maxed out at this point in time. so congress, the white house will have a bigeb
there will be a counter trr mission. there is a mission in the afghan and pakistan region. is it a suffice counter terror force with a force package? that takes us out of the nation building and the embedded with the afghan force. we are embedded with that force. we go to an operational level, the president has given us a thearm is not accurate. troops are not in combat operations. >> i agree all the time in afghanistan, but this question of what is the going to be in the next 24 months and how we transition to the mission in 2014. >> thank you for your time. still ahead, new comments from tech tear of state hillary clinton who is back at work as you know. we have video. >> i am thrilled to be back. >> thrilled to be back and what else? one of the things we thought you should know. plus, major turmoil in venezuela after hugo chavez's swearing in is put on hold after surgery for cancer. the latest there and lance armstrong opens up to oprah. what's being called a no holds barred interview about his doping allegations. 0. :: i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really.
extent pakistan is playing a role in these conversations. >> reporter: that's a good question. obviously pakistan will have to play a significant role. we're trying to get more information on that as we go forward. having been in pakistan just more than a year ago for the death of osama bin laden, the challenges that exist there are as great as any, especially given waziristan and the areas where the two countries border, but also those avenues for the u.s. to be able to receive all of the munitions that it needs and its supply lines so pakistan will clearly be critical in terms of the u.s. conversation going forward. >> steve rattner? >> so chuck, just back to guns for a second. any guesses yet on what the shape of an obama package would look like and when it would come? >> well, it seems -- first of all, they said it's going to be in the state of the union. that's number one. the second is that it would -- you know, there seems to be that they're going around -- they want to push something on the magazines. push more on this mental health check aspect. i think they're going to throw th
in afghanistan, pakistan, and in iraq. certainly they have become a very potent force, and as weave seen with the mali crisis, it can easily spread into the region, into geopolitical interests of the u.s. and western countries. it is an issue that has to be dealt with immediately. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up, how a red state democrat sells the president's gun control plan, and freshman texas star congressman juaqin cast castro. the unbelievable hopes involving star linebacker. this is andrea mitchell reports only on msnbc. we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. i've got two tickets to paradise!l set? pack your bags, we'll leave tonight. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! yo
own, a part of china policy, a lot of pakistan policy, a lot of counterterrorism policy, was run directly out of the white house and out of the national security council. in this case, in the case of benghazi, because it got to a question of embassy security, it fell more directly on the state department. but, you know, you heard the echoes of some of those broader questions come up today when the secretary was asked, for example, well, why isn't the military -- why wasn't the military there to protect the benghazi consulate, and the answer is, it's not been a major mission of the military in the past to protect embassies. they mostly protect the classified documents. >> this wasn't an embassy, it was an intelligence listening post, that's why they didn't want a military presence, they didn't want to draw attention to it. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. a
organizations. mali, obviously, has become one. pakistan continues to be a place where these groups exist. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the ca
in pakistan. >> and it's happened in pakistan. and the long-term impact -- i've said here -- the long-term impact of indiscriminately dropping, you know, bombs on civilians to kill terrorists. >> right. >> has long-term implications for us. we're going to be paying for as a country for decades to come. >> there's a short-term benefit, but the long-term consequences that people not liking americans are feeling that america isn't back to predator nation. >> it's beyond that. you kill my 4-year-old daughter, i don't just not like you. >> yeah. >> i spend the rest of my life trying to destroy you. and that's happening. again, it's not just happening in countries where we have declared war. we're now going into country after country after country. and i guess, rick, what i don't understand is where are the civil liberties lawyers, the constitutional lawyers that were so concerned during the bush administration, for good reason, about how far we push the boundaries in the war on terror? where are those people now that we are killing innocent civilians across the world? >> well, we're still
way for some of the teachers and aid workers killed in pakistan yesterday. five were killed when their van came under attack. they were on their way home from a community center. there has been a militant can campaign of violence against aid workers and these work verse been vaccinating pakistani children against polio. >> no charges are to be filed against a celebrity photographer who hit and killed a photographer taking pictures of justin bieber's car. bieber wasn't even in the car at the time. a friend was driving. >> and here's something that might make you feel better if you've already broken your new year's resolution to lose weight. a government analysis shows people who are overweight by 30 pounds or less have a significant live lower risk of early death than those at a normal weight. the lead researcher says they're not sure why but it's been suggested overweight people see a doctor more often and doctors may pay more attention to their overweight patients. >> stocks are soaring on this first day of the new year. court any reagan is here with what's moving your money. th
have pakistan next door. that is still where the majority of the terrorism that affects us is coming from. but i think people do understand particularly after osama bin laden was killed that we need to draw down significantly. that we need to scale back our presence in the region. because look at the end of the day we're not going to create a jeffersonian democracy in afghanistan. that's not something we even really want to do as a nation. we really want to focus more at home. >> i'm going to switch gears right now. and i'll start with joy here with regard to the talk about the president's cabinet picks this week. there's been so much discussion about that. some people have been criticizing the president for his lack of diversity. in fact, here's what congressman charlie rangel said about this on msnbc. here it is. >> it's embarrassing as hell. we've been through all this with mitt romney. we were very hard on mitt romney with his women binder. >> so overly harsh assessment by the congressman? what do you think? >> it's three people. i find it a little bit funny that we're going into
in afghanistan and pakistan and in that region share about the u.s. footprint in that part of the world. >> but if the reason we are there in addition to helping stabilize that country is to secure our own security here, what happens if when we pull out afghanistan devolves into civil war? does that pose threats for us and our security? >> well, absolutely. what we've seen in the past is that when there's a country like afghanistan that is unstable, without a central government, where people can operate in the shadows and plan attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of
them to fight the insurgency, which he says in pakistan. he hopes the americans will be able to their special operation missions to get the insurgency, the taliban that won't talk. and he says most of those are actually across the border. he also mentioned he will talk about the immunity, that he needs to talk to the afghan people. but in the end, it's the afghan people who are going to decide whether or not they will be willing to give the american troops that immunity. >> the u.s. government insisted both starting with leaks and then publicly from the white house and then personally from the president today that there will be zero troops if there isn't an immunity deal. do you get the sense that president karzai believes that, or does he think that this is something that can be bargained? >> i do believe that president karzai believes that. people around him may not believe that. in fact, his chief of staff earl yes said america needs afghanistan more than afghanistan needs america, which many of us here would say that's not the case. if anything, we've heard more and more
with afghanistan that i expect some continued association in the future. >> and, of course, an election in pakistan to come in a few months, too. michael o'hanlon and dana milbank. gentlemen, thank you so much. stay with us, our "top line" week in review is coming up. >> he has long severed his ties with the republican party. this is an in-your-face nomination to the president to all of us who were supportive of israel. >> yes, yes, in his face! in his face! >> yes, in the face! [ male announcer ] when ziggy the cat appeared at their door, he opened up jake's very private world. at first, jake's family thought they saved ziggy, but his connection with jake has been a lifesaver. for a love this strong, his family only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein... ...to help keep ziggy's body as strong as a love that reaches further than anyone's words. iams. keep love strong. >>> stay with us. this week's "top lines" are coming up. >> i don't quite understand why everybody would be afraid that we determine what is happening. >> i'm here to tell you, 1776 will co
's hoping he will have an effect across the border with the insurgency that he says stems from pakistan. >> general, have we met our goals there? >> do we know what our established goals are other than going after osama bin laden? >> the mission evolved over time, but first, under secretary rumsfeld we weren't going stay and then we got in a fight in 2002 and then we continued to drag this mission forward because we realized the taliban will be reconstituted. by 2005 they had reconstituted and they were posing an increasing threat. so i think this is one of the cases where the country belongs to afghanistan and afghans. it's not going to be the 51st state. we've trained the forces and we've done as much as we could. can we continue to have some training and support? yes. we've got osama bin laden and it's time to transition this mission and move on. >> atia, you were one of the last reporters to interview hamid karzai. he blamed nato-aligned forces for the insurgency that has rocked the nation recently. that finger-pointing itself did that come up within the meetings in washington becau
shows this morning but ours. it's a shame. i wanted to ask her about pakistan. i'll have to wait. >> what did you learn today? >> tomorrow matthew from downton abbey is coming. >> no way! >> disastrous booking. lady mary should be coming. >> talk to matthew about lady mary. >> it's like musburger has this creepy thing. >> very creepy. >> about a.j.'s girlfriend. you've got a creepy thing about lady mary. >> we all have a creepy thing about lady mary. >> what did you learn today? >> i learned elizabeth warren and i agree on this aig thing. >> that's what i learned! we have that in common. >> fantastic. >> what would elizabeth do? you're going to get a little sticker. >> we were just talking about being old and what constitutes being old. meacham brought up winston churchill. 65 when he became prime minister. saved western civilization. if you turned 60 now, my life's behind me. churchill, not prime minister until -- >> it's time for "morning joe." now it's time for the great chuck todd. >> he's fantastic. >> we love you, chuck. i'm sorry for him. >>> with afghanistan's president h
countries, including iran and pakistan. so right now it would be interesting to see what exactly is being discussed. at the most as we both now, america wants to leave afghanistan for the most part but the afghans feel america needs to stay. >> after president karzai met with different members of the senate yesterday, he was asked a very interesting question. but the lack of answer is the most telling. take a look. >> what kind of force would you like to see left in your country? >> thank you, everybody. >> i was told by the organizer of the senate to keep quiet after this one. >> thank you, everybody. >> told by the organizer to keep quiet on that and get a pat on the arm there by mitch mcconnell. proposed keeping 15,000 troops in afghanistan. the president hasn't made it clear exactly where the numbers are going to be. do you expect there could be a full withdrawal and won't be any type of -- left behind as atia is reporting. >> i don't think so. i think the zero option is a diplomatic bluff if you like, setting up the negotiations that are taking place right now as we speak, i think th
qaeda senior leadership from pakistan. they were advised. they weren't resourced. they were able to resource themselves. and that's largely true in yemen, the horn of africa. there will be some expertise that's passed around. but it's not one type network in which if you crack part of it you automatically crack it all. you've got to go after each. >> one of the things that jumped out at me in the first interview you did with the "today" show with matt is you were talking about the importance that a commander in chief trusts his secretary of defense, trusts his commanders. did you sense there was a deficit of trust between, say, you and the president early on? in afghanistan? >> if you think of any complex endeavor that you're a part of, and you're going to do it with a team of people, if you don't trust them at the outset, you're going to have to develop trust very quickly. >> and he never chose you in this case. do you think that's the issue? >> i think he was involved. i was chosen by secretary gates, and clearly approved by the president. so i wases his commander. i replaced g
saw in pakistan, afghanistan. they find large open areas of land, failed states, weak states where they can kind of operate outside the reach of the law, but very close to strategic interests, things that are important. al qaeda, which is also believed to be linked to the benghazi attacks, and now this incident. there's a long list of this pattern of behavior that has indicated they're becoming more potent, more lethal, and more dangerous as a result of the weak and failed states in the western part of africa. >> glen, in terms of the white house on this, you know, with syria, where the situation has not gotten markedly better. there are rumors about whether or not there was a cable detailing the syrian government using chemical weapons on its own people the president has drawn a shifting line. what is on his plate in terms of foreign policy is daunting. how much capital does he have to tackle that? he is going to have to deal with it one way or another, and to really draw american attention and resources to what's happening overseas. >> he has drawn a line in the sandstorm, right?
at the moment. afghanistan, iraq, the covert campaigns in pakistan and yemen and generally we don't see civilian suffering on the front pages of the newspaper and doesn't lead the nightly news so it's important for americans to moe what their wars mean to people overseas. >> yeah. nick, i mean, we are rightly aware of -- you know, we have the vietnam memorial in washington. you have those 59,000 names there. incredibly emotional and moving experience and if you have family members or those your family knew just to walk by and see that's a moving experience. i do wonder sometimes if in this country we don't think enough about the other side of conflicts like this. you are talking about the atrocities in vietnam. you can also talk about the -- think of gulf war in 1991. very few american casualties and lots of iraqi casualties in 1991. think about the sanctions in the 1990s. hundreds of thousands of deaths that can be linked to that, think of afghanistan and the drones. do you think we really are sensitive enough to just sort of the implications of the kinds of deaths that just, you know, follow f
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